2nd Grade Retelling and Comparing Two Stories

2nd Grade Retelling and Comparing Two Stories

2nd grade lesson on retelling and comparing two stories, aligned to MA Curriculum Frameworks Standard RL 2.9: Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story by different authors or from different cultures.

– Today we're going to review the story
that we read the last time and the last time we were reading
The True Story of the Three Little Pigs and that was written by Jon Scieszka. How many people remember the story?
Very good, put your hand down. But today, you will be reading or
listening to another version of the same story,
"The Three Little Pigs." And our objectives today:
You will be able to retell a story using S-W-B-S. Raise your hand if you
remember what S-W-B-S means. Rihanna.
S means? – Solutions. – No, Layla? – S means subtitle. – No, Angelie. – It means setting. – Setting? I don't think so. Let me see, Hilda? – The someone. – The someone.
Give Hilda a big hand. She remembers it.
The S is someone or the character. Who is the someone in the story?
The S is? – Someone. – Someone.
The W is… Daoda? – What. – What or want?
– Want. – Want. What did someone want
or what did someone want to do? Who remembers what the B stands for?
Briana? – But. – The but. And but means
there is a problem. And the S, the second S means,
Alexander? – Solution.
– The solution, very good. So now remember,
we're going to retell a story using the S-W-B-S. Somebody wanted to do something,
but there is a problem so it must be solved.
There must be a solution. And then after that,
we're going to use a Venn diagram to compare and contrast
two versions of a story. And the two versions of the story,
the second version you'll be hearing today is "The Three Little Pigs." Now, let's go look at our
Common Core Standards. ELA, English Language Arts,
reading literature. Can you see that? Integration of…
– The Three Little Pigs. – The Three Little Pigs. So now, I'm going to go
back and review what do we remember about
The True Story of the Three Little Pigs? Let me put this one here
and I need a volunteer to tell me. What graphic organizer
are we using? Melody? – We're using the S-W-B-S. – Very good.
We're using the S-W-B-S. So this is story one.
We're doing S-W-B-S for story one. Give me the main character, S.
Who wanted to do something? Wow, a lot of hands I see,
very good. How about Tiani? – The wolf. – The wolf is the someone,
yes. What did he want to do?
Shh. I'm writing it down. What did the wolf want to do?
Samaya? – He wanted to make a cake
for his granny. – Okay, so what did he want to do?
– Make a cake for his granny for her birthday. – Okay, so what happened
when he wanted to make a cake? – He ran out of sugar. – He wanted to make a cake and? – He ran out of sugar. – Okay, he ran out of sugar. So what did he do?
One at a time, please. So what did he do,
Ayamir? – He went to his neighbor's house and
asked them can he borrow a cup of sugar. – Who were the neighbors? – The three little pigs. – The three little pigs.
So he went to ask… The wolf went to jail. That is The True Story
of the Three Little Pigs and the wolf said he was framed. He was saying he was not really bad.
He was only framed, okay? In this story,
did he mean to eat the pigs? – No. – Was he really a bad wolf? – No.
– No, okay. So put that in mind and now,
you're going to listen to the next version of the story,
"The Three Little Pigs." This is called a traditional version.
This is the oldest version. Keep that. I'll deal with that later.
Thank you. This is still the true story,
but it is in a song form and the title is,
"The Three Little Pigs". Now I want you to open your booklet. In your booklet,
you have the words to "The Three Little Pigs' Blues,"
all right? I'm going to play the song
and you are going to read it with your eyes. But if you want to chime in,
you are free to chime in. Just don't yell, please. [music plays] – Okay, I need a volunteer to give
me the S-W-B-S for the second story. Story two. Is it the same?
– No. – No, so I need a volunteer.
Anaya? – The wolf wanted to go
inside the three little pigs' house. – Did he want to eat the little pigs?
The wolf wanted to? What am I asking?
Okay, give Anaya a chance please. – He blew their house in. – Okay, somebody finish this,
please. The wolf wanted to eat the little pigs
so he blew the houses down, but couldn't blow the brick house. The wolf was burned when he fell in the chimney.
Is that right? – Yes. – Okay.
So when you turn your booklet to the next page, you have a Venn diagram.
Please remove the paper clip and then look at the Venn diagram.
Now, we're going to go to our objective. We're going to use the Venn diagram. What is our objective?
We're going to use the Venn diagram to compare and contrast
the two versions of the story. So your Venn diagram, on this side,
we are going to write story one and here we're going to write story two.
And I want you to write here, the wolf, just the wolf.
And here we also have the wolf as a character. Okay, what is the same about the
two wolves in the two stories? Samaya? Both of them ate the pig. Do you agree?
– Yes. No. – Both of them ate the two little pigs?
– No. – Thank you. Ayamir?
– They said both of the first and second pigs ran off. – Okay, here the wolf did not…
In the second story, Ayamir said, did not eat. In story one the wolf ate both the first and…
Okay, sorry. So are they the same?
– No. – No, they are different. Now in the story one,
what did wolf want to do? What did wolf want to do,
Daoda? – He wanted to make a cake
for his old granny. – Okay, and here in story two,
what did the wolf want to do? Just eat the pigs? – He wanted to go inside their house
and eat them. – He wanted to go inside
the house and why? Why did he want to go inside
the houses of the little pigs? – To cook them.
– Cook them and eat them? Yeah, I guess so. So in story one,
he ate both the first and second pig. In story two,
he did not eat the first two little pigs because the pigs ran away. Another difference is that story one,
the wolf wanted to make a cake for his grandma. In story two,
he just wanted to go in the pigs' houses so he can cook them and
eat them like what Lashan said. I want you to think about,
is there something the same or similar with the wolf?
What is the same about the wolf in story one and the wolf in story two?
Layla? – Both of them blew two of the houses down. – Okay, very good.
That is the same. The wolf was able to knock down
the two houses in both stories. Let me ask you a question.
Does the wolf in story one like to eat pigs? Did he eat the first two little pigs?
– Yes. – So does he like to eat pigs?
Daoda? – He just wants to ask them for a cup of sugar.
They just… They said… – Yeah, but if there is a pig
right there on hand, does he want to eat the pigs?
– No. – Did he eat the pigs?
– No. Yes. – Yes, he ate. – But he didn't want to. – I know, but if somebody eats something,
does it mean he does not like it? – No.
– That means what? That means you like it,
whether or not you killed it or not, you still eat it because you…
– Liked it. – So I guess that in story one,
the wolf likes to eat pigs. We're not saying he killed them, right?
– No. – No. And in story two,
does the wolf like to eat the pigs? – No. – Why was he there knocking in the house?
Did he want to eat the pigs? Naya? – He wanted to eat the pigs. – In story two. – He wanted to eat the pigs. – He wanted to eat the pigs.
That's why he came knocking down. That's the reason why
he was there in story two. So I would like you to think about this and I believe that there's
something common about the wolf. The wolf in story one and
the wolf in story two, he likes to… – Eat pigs. – Eat pigs.

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