3 Literary Documentaries

3 Literary Documentaries

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  1. I really enjoyed The Fire Next Time, that I just finished after picking it up on your recommendation, so I certainly want to watch "I am not your negro" soon. I've seen the Didion documentary around on Netflix and been curious about it since I read my first book of hers the other month, but I'm unsure if I should wait until I've read more of her work first. Another fantastic video!

  2. Catcher in the Rye is definitely not "only meaningful to white men of a certain generation." When I was a high school teacher several years ago, Catcher in the Rye was the only book we read all year that the kids got excited about and appeared to enjoy reading. For some, I'm pretty sure it was the only one they actually read.

  3. I’m curious, did you read the biography of Mr Salinger written by Kenneth Slawenski, JD Salinger: A Life? It’s stunning for exactly the reasons the documentary was not…it focuses as much, if not more, on the author’s writing ✍️ than on his scintillating “life”. I love that Slawenski, who ran the Dead Caulfields website for years, respected Salinger’s authorship more than he did Salinger’s drinking his own urine. Lol. If you’ve not read it, please consider the biography, Ashley. I think you’d enjoy Salinger’s The New Yorker days, including rejected short stories and friendships. Fun to read about Salinger’s frustrations and joys in submitting to the magazine; makes him real to us. Agree wholeheartedly with your review of Salerno’s overly-hyped film, which truly took the low road, even if it was clothed in an academic robe. Thank you, Ashley. Wayne Chicago.

  4. This was excellent! What's esp striking about I Am Not Your Negro is how what they (Baldwin, Malcolm, Martin, etc.) were talking about back in the 60's has come home to roost & is just as relevant today. Hearing Baldwin's words (brilliantly spoken by S Jackson) show a direct line to BLM. Thanks for this wonderful video.

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