Tag Archives: oxford

How to prepare kindergarten children for writing in English

How to prepare kindergarten children for writing in English

Teach 21st century skills with confidence Improve kindergarten children’s hand-eye coordination, pencil movement and letter recognition with this alphabet card activity. This activity is great for all levels, as well as children with learning difficulties, such as dyslexia This activity teaches the following 21st century skill: communication. Developing our children’s writing is animportant part of learning to communicate in English. This activity will improve their hand-eyecoordination, pencil movement and letter… Read Article →

Shakespeare in our time

Shakespeare in our time

Professor David Schalkwyk of Queen Mary University of London argues that the most significant developments in Shakespeare today are to be found not in academic work, but in the reimagining of the plays in different cultures around the world. Theme by theme, Illuminating Shakespeare brings together the very best Shakespeare resources from across Oxford University Press. This includes free access to materials for every level, from school to scholarly research…. Read Article →

Shakespeare and the Supernatural | Michael Dobson

Shakespeare and the Supernatural | Michael Dobson

Michael Dobson explores Shakespeare’s use of ghosts, fairies, witches, and all elements of the supernatural. He proposes that the ways in which we understand them today has been shaped by Shakespeare – from the ghost in Hamlet to the miniature fairy Queen Mab from Romeo and Juliet. Theme by theme, Illuminating Shakespeare brings together the very best Shakespeare resources from across Oxford University Press. This includes free access to materials… Read Article →

Faster than a calculator | Arthur Benjamin | TEDxOxford

Faster than a calculator | Arthur Benjamin | TEDxOxford

Never miss a talk! SUBSCRIBE to the TEDx channel: Benjamin makes numbers dance. In his day job, he’s a professor of mathematics at Harvey Mudd College; in his other day job, he’s a “Mathemagician,” taking the stage to perform high-speed mental calculations, memorisations and other astounding mathematic stunts. It’s part of his drive to teach math and mental agility in interesting ways, following in the footsteps of such heroes as… Read Article →

Shakespeare and Race

Shakespeare and Race

Ayanna Thompson considers the theme of race in Shakespeare’s plays, the extent to which he would have been aware of Africans, and how he introduced them into his plays. She discusses the current debate amongst black actors about whether or not to play the part of Othello. Ayanna Thompson is Professor of English at George Washington University, and she specializes in Renaissance drama and issues of race in/as performance. She… Read Article →

The Bible, translated by Nicholas King

The Bible, translated by Nicholas King

A critical review of Nicholas King’s translation of the Bible. My copy is a sewn hardback with text formatted in a single column, verse-by-verse in the Old Testament, but broken into paragraphs in the New. The Old Testament features page-bottom notes, while the flow of the New Testament books is interrupted by commentary intermixed with the text. The font is Adobe Garamond, printed too lightly for my taste. I agree… Read Article →

On the street where Dickens lived

On the street where Dickens lived

Ruth Richardson, author of Dickens and the Workhouse, shows us the area that inspired ‘Oliver Twist’. we're standing in Cleveland Street just north of where Dickens lived as a child and as a young man and just in front of the workhouse which was threatened with demolition earlier this year luckily I joined the campaign to save it and in the process found that Dickens had lived absolutely in this… Read Article →

Dr. Seuss - The Ninth Best Selling Fiction Author | Mini Bio | BIO

Dr. Seuss – The Ninth Best Selling Fiction Author | Mini Bio | BIO

Theodor Seuss Geisel was born in 1904 in Massachusetts. He published his first children’s book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, under the name of Dr. Seuss in 1937. Next came a string of best sellers, including The Cat in the Hat. #Biography Subscribe for more Biography: Delve deeper into Biography on our site: Follow Biography for more surprising stories from fascinating lives: Facebook – Instagram… Read Article →

This is Shakespeare by Emma Smith | Live at Conway Hall

This is Shakespeare by Emma Smith | Live at Conway Hall

Michael Pennington, Natascha McElhone, Jonathan Forbes and Professor Emma Smith star in a dazzling tribute to the greatest playwright of the 21st or any other century. This is Shakespeare is out now: A genius and prophet whose timeless works encapsulate the human condition like no others. A writer who surpassed his contemporaries in vision, originality and literary mastery. Who wrote like an angel, putting it all so much better than… Read Article →

Shakespeare and Religion

Shakespeare and Religion

Rev. Dr Paul Edmondson, Head of Research and Knowledge at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, explores the religious influences in Shakespeare’s work in the context of 16th century England – a time when the Church of England was given an established authority, Pope Pius V had excommunicated Queen Elizabeth I, and anti-Catholic laws were introduced. He explores how Shakespeare handles religious themes in his plays, and how he uses images from… Read Article →

Introducing The New Oxford Shakespeare

Introducing The New Oxford Shakespeare

Professor Gary Taylor, lead general editor of The New Oxford Shakespeare gives a swift introduction to the new Complete Works edition, and what people will find in it – all the plays and poetry plus innovative introductions to different critical interpretations and options for performance. www.oup.com/new-oxford-shakespeare Gary Taylor is the lead General Editor of The New Oxford Shakespeare. He is Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University, where he founded the interdisciplinary… Read Article →

Shakespeare and death

Shakespeare and death

Professor Laurie Maguire discusses the theme of death in Shakespeare’s tragedies, histories, and comedies. She considers how Elizabethans encountered death on a daily basis, and how Shakespeare was clearly very familiar with the details of death, and murder. www.oup.com/Shakespeare Laurie Maguire is Professor of English at the University of Oxford, tutorial fellow at Magdalen College, and the author or editor of several books. She is a regular theater reviewer for… Read Article →

Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens - Chapter 1 - Reading - British English Pronunciation

Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens – Chapter 1 – Reading – British English Pronunciation

Me reading the first chapter of Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens OLIVER TWIST OR THE PARISH BOY’S PROGRESS BY CHARLES DICKENS CHAPTER I TREATS OF THE PLACE WHERE OLIVER TWIST WAS BORN AND OF THE CIRCUMSTANCES ATTENDING HIS BIRTH Among other public buildings in a certain town, which for many reasons it will be prudent to refrain from mentioning, and to which I will assign no fictitious name, there is… Read Article →

Oxford- Full Tour

Oxford- Full Tour

VIsit and explore the university city of Oxford UK the Tour Guides’Travel Guides’ way. Rich Jones takes you on a comprehensive journey through the City of Dreaming Spires starting at the Martyr’s Memorial. Take in the beautiful sites of Cornmarket, St. Martin’s, Carfax, Bodelian, Christ Church, St. Aldates, Oriel, Corpus Christi, Covered Market, Radcliffe, Balliol, Sheldonian, Clarendon etc. Great history and even better tips!

Shakespeare and Sexuality

Shakespeare and Sexuality

Stanley Wells analyses the references to sexuality in Shakespeare’s plays and poems. From his earlier comedies, such as The Two Gentleman of Verona or Much Ado About Nothing, where he is unafraid to play with this topic, to his middle and last texts where he demonstrates a deeper preoccupation with the destructive potential of sexual desire. Theme by theme, Illuminating Shakespeare brings together the very best Shakespeare resources from across… Read Article →

On the joy of not rehearsing Shakespeare

On the joy of not rehearsing Shakespeare

How Oxford Academic Professor Tiffany Stern helped a pioneering company of American actors to see Shakespeare and other early modern playwrights in a new light – by almost totally eschewing rehearsals. www.ox.ac.uk/researchimpacts [Ralph Alan Cohen:] Just imagine any show — the last show you went to — if you knew that every single thing that was being done on stage was the responsibility of the person doing it. [Gregory Jon… Read Article →

Shakespeare’s reputation

Shakespeare’s reputation

Gordon McMullan, Professor of English at King’s College London, argues that Shakespeare differed from many of his contemporaries due to his extraordinary facility with language, his shrewd business sense, and particular practical circumstances. Some of his qualities which we value so highly today would not have been evident to the writer himself. In fact ‘the Shakespeare we know best is one the Germans invented’. Theme by theme, Illuminating Shakespeare brings… Read Article →

Shakespeare and Nature

Shakespeare and Nature

Charlotte Scott explains how Shakespeare uses the natural world to amplify the emotional and psychological elements of his plays. She examines the use of the forest in As You Like It, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Titus Andronicus and Two Gentlemen of Verona. www.oup.com/Shakespeare Charlotte Scott is a Senior Lecturer in Shakespeare at Goldsmiths College, University of London. She has written widely on Shakespeare, including Shakespeare and the Idea of the… Read Article →